Your backyard can help clean the Potomac—here's how

Your backyard can help clean the Potomac—here's how

Just one inch of rain generates 2,000 gallons of runoff from a typical suburban home. Multiple that by the number of homes in our area and you can see why polluted runoff is the fastest growing source of pollution to the Potomac.

Hear from the experts at Backyard Bounty on how to transform your yard into a river friendly garden that fights pollution and naturally absorbs runoff.

Read More

Get the behind the scenes scoop on the District Wharf’s river friendly features

Get the behind the scenes scoop on the District Wharf’s river friendly features

The newly re-designed District Wharf in Washington, DC isn’t just a playground for river lovers, it’s a model of pollution-preventing, river-friendly development. Discover how hidden elements in the neighborhood’s sidewalks, pavement, and roofs are keeping many Olympic swimming pools of contaminants out of the Potomac every year.

Read More

Your lawn might be a polluter. Here's what you can do

Your lawn might be a polluter. Here's what you can do

You might not realize it, but your lawn could be polluting the Potomac and harming local wildlife. Having a healthy lawn fit for summer picnics and protecting clean water aren't mutually exclusive. Hear from a lawn care professional on how to take steps to ensure your lawn, big or small, is river friendly!

Read More

3 Pollutants in the Potomac River You've Never Heard of

3 Pollutants in the Potomac River You've Never Heard of

Though the fight against river pollution is gaining momentum, action still needs to be taken against some of the lesser known contaminants plaguing the Potomac. These pesky pestilences may sound unfamiliar, but they can have catastrophic effects on wildlife and public health.

Find out what these pollutants are, how they get into the water, and what can be done to get them out!

Read More

Take Action: Save Montgomery County’s clean water funding

Take Action: Save Montgomery County’s clean water funding

In a rare move, Montgomery County Council Executive Ike Leggett just vetoed $50M that was committed to  local clean water programs. It’s time to Get Vocal to defend clean water in Montgomery County!

Submit your comment today and tell your local leaders to quit playing politics with our water.

Read More

Your backyard can help clean the Potomac—here's how

Your backyard can help clean the Potomac—here's how

Just one inch of rain generates 2,000 gallons of runoff from a typical suburban home. Multiple that by the number of homes in our area and you can see why polluted runoff is the fastest growing source of pollution to the Potomac.

Hear from the experts at Backyard Bounty on how to transform your yard into a river friendly garden that fights pollution and naturally absorbs runoff.

Read More

5 ways to pollute the Potomac River that are completely legal

5 ways to pollute the Potomac River that are completely legal

With all the progress made since the Clean Water Act was passed in 1972, it may still surprise you to learn there are plenty of ways you can still legally pollute the Potomac River.

Learn how our community allows pollution into our Nation's River – the drinking water source for you and nearly 6 million people – and what you can do about it.

Read More

Your lawn might be a polluter. Here's what you can do.

Your lawn might be a polluter. Here's what you can do.

You might not realize it, but your lawn could be polluting the Potomac and harming local wildlife. Having a healthy lawn fit for summer picnics and protecting clean water aren't mutually exclusive. Hear from a lawn care professional on how to take steps to ensure your lawn, big or small, is river friendly!

Read More

Streets all over the DMV are turning green. Why?

Streets all over the DMV are turning green. Why?

Have you noticed? Green streets are sprouting up in neighborhoods across the DMV.

From rain gardens to permeable pavement to roadside trees, “green streets” are doing more than boosting curb appeal. Learn more about this new landscaping trend and how it just might save the Potomac.

Read More

Report finds rain absorbent parking lots increasingly popular

Report finds rain absorbent parking lots increasingly popular

Thanks to policy incentives and community demand, local developers are embracing river friendly growth and making strides in reducing the amount of polluted runoff that floods the Potomac. Find out what innovative program in DC is setting out to spur investment in nature-based solutions and might one day serve as a model for cities across the country. 

Read More

State Delays put Montgomery County Clean Water Permit In Limbo

State Delays put Montgomery County Clean Water Permit In Limbo

Today's post comes to us from Danila Sheveiko, Former Co-Chair, Montgomery County Water Quality Advisory Group. Danila explores the reasons why the County's 5 year clean water permit may be delayed, putting at-risk local efforts to reduce polluted runoff in the County's streams and rivers.

Read More