Why does densely populated DC have so much wildlife?

Why does densely populated DC have so much wildlife?

A quick Google search of the phrase "DC area wildlife sightings" kicks back thousands of results. From bears and bats to coyotes, dolphins, and eagles - it's clear we are not the only ones living here.

But why is our densely populated metro area of more than 5 million people home to so much wildlife?

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Exercise your right to clean water in November

Exercise your right to clean water in November

Don't let others make clean water decisions without your input!

The headlines day in and day out may be all about the White House, but casting your vote at the local level is just as important!

Learn why local elections matter for clean water and how your elected officials can prevent polluted runoff from degrading our streams and rivers.

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Guest Post: Federal Court Upholds Chesapeake Bay Restoration Plan

Guest Post: Federal Court Upholds Chesapeake Bay Restoration Plan

In a huge win for clean water, a federal court recently upheld the multi-state Chesapeake Bay restoration plan.

Ridge Hall with the Chesapeake Legal Alliance explains the historic court case and what the ruling means for the Potomac and in all the rivers, streams, and creeks that feed the Chesapeake Bay. 

 

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Action Alert: Tell DC Water Not to Delay Its Pollution Reduction Plans

Action Alert: Tell DC Water Not to Delay Its Pollution Reduction Plans

DC Water is requesting a delay in its pollution reduction plan for the Potomac of five years. 

Stand with Potomac Conservancy and call on DC Water to stick to its original timeline for reducing the flow of diluted sewage into the rivers and streams in our Nation’s Capital.

Email your comments on DC Water now!

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7 Clean Water Tips for Earth Day and Every Day

7 Clean Water Tips for Earth Day and Every Day

No matter the size of your effort, you can make a difference in keeping our rivers and streams clean. We've put together a quick list of seven tips that will help protect clean water in our communities. What can you do for clean water?

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Safe Drinking Water Starts at the Source

Safe Drinking Water Starts at the Source

Ever wonder where the water that flows from your tap water comes from?

Many people turn on their water without thinking about its source, but the members of the Potomac River Basin Drinking Water Source Protection Partnership — are committed to safeguarding those very sources. Learn more about their efforts after the jump!

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Our Nation's River: A Troubled Past, A Bright Future

Our Nation's River: A Troubled Past, A Bright Future

The Potomac and Anacostia Rivers flowing through our Nation’s Capital should be a point of pride for those living and working in Washington, D.C., but are they?

Potomac Conservancy Policy Manager, Amanda John, takes a closer look at the District's clean water efforts over the years, and the existing challenges that still remain.

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Maryland’s Pollution Solution: Local Funds for Local Runoff Problems

Maryland’s Pollution Solution: Local Funds for Local Runoff Problems

The Potomac River and the Chesapeake Bay need our help. During rainstorms, pollutants like motor oils, excess nutrients, pesticides, and trash flow directly into your local rivers and streams. This toxic stew running off the land is the only growing source of pollution entering local waterways.

Maryland’s state legislature stood up for clean water and passed the 2012 Watershed Protection and Restoration Law to curb runoff levels in our waters. But the law is under attack.

Email your state legislators, now, and urge them to maintain critical funding to protect our local lands and waters!

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Be a Voice for Clean Water – Help Save Maryland’s Ten Mile Creek!

Be a Voice for Clean Water – Help Save Maryland’s Ten Mile Creek!

Montgomery County, Maryland is home to one of the most pristine waterways in the Chesapeake Bay region: Ten Mile Creek in Clarksburg Town Center. But this important natural resource is in trouble.

Long-time development plans threaten to strip healthy forests and habitat surrounding the Creek, removing important natural defenses and water quality protections.

On March 4, Montgomery County Council will vote and decide whether to restrict future development activities along the Creek.

If you live in Montgomery County and would like to stand up for local water quality protections, tell your Montgomery County Council representatives to save Ten Mile Creek before March 4!

Contact Montgomery County Council officials >

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